Fort MOCs

“Royal Marines Broadside Bay” by The Brick Stop

Have you ever wondered what would have happened if the LEGO Group had continued the Pirate theme beyond 1997? What direction would the sets have taken? Would new factions or sub themes have been introduced?

Jason B of The Brick Stop offers speculative answers to these questions by exploring new possibilities through his digital design skills. He’s produced a couple of Imperial Armada set concepts, Armada Cove and Prison Island, a pirate cove named Wreckers Bay (to show everyone how 6281 Pirates Perilous Pitfall should have been done), and The Queens Guard, a MOC based on his first original sub theme of the same name.

He has now expanded his repertoire with “Royal Marines Broadside Bay”, a fort manned by a new faction which repurposes classic LEGO Town firefighter torsos as military uniforms.


Jason writes:

Welcome to the Royal Marines Broadside Bay!
I’ve given my black uniform soldiers a home!
Recently I’ve been taking old town firefighter torsos and converting them to imperial guards from the pirate theme!
I thought it would be fun to see what a set would look like if they had gotten one! 😄
Here is what I came up with.


"Broadside Bay" from the back

The rear review – watch out for the alligator!


The Backstory

It was named “Broadside Bay” after Captain Redbeard unloaded a full broadside on an imperial port town located in said bay.  After that, the Royal Marines constructed this fortification to protect the bay. But the name stuck for good. Needless to say, Governor Broadside thinks the bay was named after him.  Just wait until he finds out the truth!


About the Builder…

Jason Brown is a masterful digital builder who creates LEGO designs in the style of the official sets released during the mid 90s. He often (but not always) limits himself to using the pieces which were available at the time for that added level of authenticity. You can acquire building instructions for some of his masterpieces from his Gumroad store or peruse his Instagram profile to enjoy the full gamut of his work.